The Music Instinct

You know more about music than you think. You start picking up the rules from the day you are born, yes even before. And part of what makes music enjoyable is this knowledge of what to expect and the delight when your expectations are fulfilled, or some times bent a little before they find resolution. This is part of the message of a fascinating book about music, The Music Instinct by Philip Ball, (read reviews for instance in The Economist, or in The Guardian) a book that I finally had time to finish reading this week-end. [Read More]

Experiment shows: walking heel first more efficient

This will not, of course, settle the agelong debate of whether to walk toe first or heel first in tango. Still, I found it interesting that there has recently been published research on the efficiency of the human walk, specifically investigating walking heel first versus walking toe first. If you are striving for the most efficient walk, their conclusion might be worth noting: When human subjects walked with their heels slightly elevated in a ‘low-digitigrade’[toe first] posture, COT [cost of transport] increased by 53% above that of normal plantigrade [heel first] walking. [Read More]

Eating the marshmellow

by Sarah Marafi (мυƒƒιησσн™) I just read a very interesting article in the New Yorker about research on people’s ability to deter satisfaction, and how it could be a character treat determined very early. The researchers performed an experiment where children were given the choice of eating a marshmellow now, or wait fifteen minutes, waiting in front of the marshmellows, and get two marshmellows. Some kids were able to find ways of distracting themselves, earning the extra marshmellow in the end. [Read More]