The origins of 'Tango Nuevo'

When I heard about the Dinzel book, I thought it was sort of a curious project. Working through all possibilities of tango steps, charting them out in elaborate diagrams with circles and arrows in all directions demonstrating the vast space of choreographic possibilites. I had a look at the book at a friend’s place several years ago, but it felt somehow disconnected to how I experienced the dance. [Read More]

The structure of a tango, choreography and how it might improve your dancing

by aperte If you prefer your naïve, pure emotional interpretation of the tango, you might not want to read this. If, on the other hand you think that knowing a little about how tango music is organized might increase the breadth or depth of your musical appreciation, then this could be for you. Like Tangocommuter writes in the discussion of how a tango became approximately three minutes long, a prototypical tango has the structure ABA: [Read More]

Pas de finesse...

by Jayanth Sharma Staying in Buenos Aires for a few months provided several eye-openers. One of the great revelations was concerning the logic of the dance, or rather the lack of it, and how this adds spice to the dance: We were taking lessons with various teachers, with very different philosophies with respect to tango, how to dance it and how to learn it. Gustavo Naveira, the great master, dissected each step carefully, explaining exactly how and why and which steps were crossed and which were open etc. [Read More]

Nuevo tools, nuevo problems

Models can be very useful. By making a simplified version of the world that we are able to grasp, we may learn something about the world outside the model as well. This approach has proven very successful in a lot of areas, and is also applied to tango. There is a danger associated with model building, as everyone working with them should know, and that is to mistake the model for reality. [Read More]