The structure of a tango, choreography and how it might improve your dancing

by aperte If you prefer your naïve, pure emotional interpretation of the tango, you might not want to read this. If, on the other hand you think that knowing a little about how tango music is organized might increase the breadth or depth of your musical appreciation, then this could be for you. Like Tangocommuter writes in the discussion of how a tango became approximately three minutes long, a prototypical tango has the structure ABA: [Read More]

Happy New Year!

happy new year 2009 by basibanget, on Flickr Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 Generic License by  basibanget

Ready for a new year of tango? Remember that if you want to improve, there is no secret, all you have to do is to follow three simple steps:

  1. Learn from the best

  2. Practice (a lot)

  3. Listen to lots of music

Nobody ever said it was gonna be easy ;-)

Why we never tire of tango music

by nadworks Tango music for the non-argentine 21st century tango lover is often something of an acquired taste. At least for tango dancers. The recordings are old, the music sounds strange, we don’t understand the lyrics – but we love the dance… After some time, we get more into the music, it all changes, and we become total fanáticos de tango, we can never get enough of the classics of tango music. [Read More]

Classes and entertainment

Why do people take classes? When I first started out in tango, I assumed people attended to classes to learn how to dance or to improve their dance, learning steps or improving technique or other skills. How naïve. After several years more, I have discovered that people take classes for a variety of reasons, some of which I find perfectly reasonable, others I still cannot really understand. The good reasons are: [Read More]