The Secret -- Don't tell anyone

The main character is asked to prepare an omelet in the morning for his master, a Parisian intellectual. Feeling his cooking is underappreciated, he contemplates the intellectuals’ missing reflection on his artistry in the kitchen. This is clearly about tango: (From Monique Truong’s The Book of Salt:) Like children, gullible and full of wonder, they always ask, "What is your secret?" Do I look like a fool? I ask myself each time. [Read More]

Gingerbread milonga

Some friends (also tango maniacs, of course) made this just before Christmas a couple of years ago. A really tasty milonga it was! Welcome to Club Grizelle! I released the photos under a Creative Commons license, so feel free to use them for whatever non-commercial purpose you like :-) I appreciate a link and a comment if you find use for it. Maybe they can be useful for invitations to your Christmas milonga? [Read More]

Nuevo tools, nuevo problems

Models can be very useful. By making a simplified version of the world that we are able to grasp, we may learn something about the world outside the model as well. This approach has proven very successful in a lot of areas, and is also applied to tango. There is a danger associated with model building, as everyone working with them should know, and that is to mistake the model for reality. [Read More]

Salón Canning

I realize that the guys at Movement invites movement are not afraid of provocation, but I think they suffer a tiny bit from a syndrome often associated with Gringos, shooting from the waist. In their rant abot Canning, they fail to recognize a few important reasons Canning has such an important position. Aside from being one of the very best floors in the city (maybe the very best), it attracts many excellent dancers. [Read More]

In the eye of the beholder

Isn’t it funny how we see so different things, even when watching the exact same event? I remember seeing containers all over the place while we were renovating our appartment, a friend who is an architect and carpenter seemed to literally see through the walls in the house before we bought it. A trained art expert will instantly recognize the work of an artist, an analyst will see through the endless rows of numbers in a spreadsheet… [Read More]

Follow the leader?

Johanna’s comment and her subsequent post on leads and follows inspired me to write an entire post in addition to the comment in her blog. In her post (and follow-up) she argues why you would want to use the terms lead and follow for the two dancers in a tango embrace, and discuss howthey are surrounded with angst. I find it to be the terms man and woman that are surrounded by angst, and that is probably the reason people use lead and follow as euphemisms for man and woman. [Read More]

Masquerade

Who are you when you are dancing? Are you the leader? The follower? The man? The woman? I was once confronted with my using the terminology man/woman in class. The person complaining said that she was dancing a role (she was dancing the man’s part) and that was the role of the leader. I know this easily gets messy, but I never liked the euphemism leader/follower when what we are talking about is a man and a woman in most cases. [Read More]

Lágrima Ríos & Candombe

I just love the name! Lágrima Ríos is a wonderful artistic name, Rivers of tears.. Re tango, no? My attention was brought to some of her recordings by Michael’s music blog, discussing some available recordings of hers. Luckily, I was able to find them both at emusic for instant satisfaction :-) She is featured in the film Café de los maestros, which I have not yet been able to get hold of (but will eventually! [Read More]