The Impossibility of Re-Creating the Tango of Times Gone By

by OldOnliner There is a paradox concerning my relationship with tango, and maybe with tango itself. On one hand, I want to learn from the sources, learn the ‘true’ tango. If that even exists. On the other hand, I want to see progress, to move on, and to find or invent ‘my own’ tango. Which may not exist, either. This tension between a certain nostalgia and the Sisyphean quest for the authentic, and the longing for progress, a rational approach, the tension between being controlled by the tango and taking control over the tango is at once frustrating and tantalizing. [Read More]

The origins of 'Tango Nuevo'

When I heard about the Dinzel book, I thought it was sort of a curious project. Working through all possibilities of tango steps, charting them out in elaborate diagrams with circles and arrows in all directions demonstrating the vast space of choreographic possibilites. I had a look at the book at a friend’s place several years ago, but it felt somehow disconnected to how I experienced the dance. [Read More]

The structure of a tango, choreography and how it might improve your dancing

by aperte If you prefer your naïve, pure emotional interpretation of the tango, you might not want to read this. If, on the other hand you think that knowing a little about how tango music is organized might increase the breadth or depth of your musical appreciation, then this could be for you. Like Tangocommuter writes in the discussion of how a tango became approximately three minutes long, a prototypical tango has the structure ABA: [Read More]

On circulation

by pdcawley Ms Hedgehog is researching the dynamics of flow in the ronda, comparing with traffic and pondering about the importance of song length. While song length can probably have some influence, I believe other factors are much more significant. And it is kind of hard to perform real experiments, even though she deserves credit for the attempt. According to Jorge Dispari, the flow on the dance floors of Buenos Aires used to be much better than today. [Read More]

The dual nature of tango

by airpark I often wonder why tango is so attractive, why I (and others with me) got so obsessed with it. Why we never tire of it. In part, I think it has to do with the infinite depth that can be found within it, and part of the source of this I believe is the dual nature of tango, or its apparent paradoxes. Making it difficult to explain or describe what tango is and isn’t. [Read More]

Evolution

by Kaptain Kobold It’s the year of Darwin this year. In a radio show, different scientists were discussing Darwin’s impact on their fields. The art historian made a point out of the fact that after Darwin, people no longer expected the evolution to be linear, or directed towards a specific goal. Always improving. It became clear that modern art would change, take different forms. The direction of change would be an other matter entirely. [Read More]

Why we never tire of tango music

by nadworks Tango music for the non-argentine 21st century tango lover is often something of an acquired taste. At least for tango dancers. The recordings are old, the music sounds strange, we don’t understand the lyrics – but we love the dance… After some time, we get more into the music, it all changes, and we become total fanáticos de tango, we can never get enough of the classics of tango music. [Read More]

Nuevo tools, nuevo problems

Models can be very useful. By making a simplified version of the world that we are able to grasp, we may learn something about the world outside the model as well. This approach has proven very successful in a lot of areas, and is also applied to tango. There is a danger associated with model building, as everyone working with them should know, and that is to mistake the model for reality. [Read More]